The Wendigo

the_wendigoBefore I went on my outrageous tirade against The King in Yellow I decided that I really wanted to read The Wendigo by our favourite unassuming author: Algernon Blackwood.

Question 1: Why did I read The Wendigo?

When the internet was first introduced to my world, a whole new dimension opened itself up to me: a new dimension filled with old friends. Being an Apple groupie at heart, I immediately went to iTunes, and then downloaded podcasts, and like any self-respecting human being one wasn’t enough. Few things seldom are.

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The King in Yellow Must Die

Introduction:

Things have all gone their merry way, and now the end of October is upon us, which subsequently means the fall of the King in Yellow, ultimately signifying the end with The King in Yellow. And good riddance too; I nearly bored myself to death making stuff up. Lesson learned: Never make a blog series longer than three posts.

I promise to remain short, sweet, and simple from now on.

Conclusion Before the Conclusion:

Now I will tell you what I think the King in Yellow represents in Robert W. Chamber’s world: death. Wearing a different suit, that is. Think about it: a mask which is not a mask, tattered robes, insanity, chaos, confusion, melodrama . . .

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The King in Yellow, Part 5

Intro:

IMG_0730The King in Yellow has a hint of the romantic wherever one looks, from the first story to the last. If we were to draw any more conclusions, then the King in Yellow must be very fond of his Harlequins. That is, the ones where someone dies, or goes insane, or goes insane and then dies.

As long as there’s a touch of irony, and chaos reigns supreme I suppose!

Our journey has dragged on thus far, or so it seems. It appears that we may have come to an impasse: what is going on? Has the book gone insane half way through, like Ergo Proxy did in its run?

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The King in Yellow, Part 4

Second Thoughts:

I feel as if In the Court of the Dragon was meant as a precursor for The Yellow Sign. Now, from hints and riddles pried from the previous three stories we can now make several educated guesses at a few hundredths of what the King in Yellow is made of. None of it is sugar and spice, if any of you were wondering. Like any self-respecting fictional entity, the King in Yellow is best thought of as having no gender.

If you recall our character was chased down by a malignant, dead-white slender man in a black suit. On my second reread of the story I picked up on the man’s description. On my first read I assumed he was Death in the flesh. What if he’s Slender Man? Does Slender Man work for the King in Yellow?

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The King in Yellow, Part 3

Intro:

Another day, another dollar; and once again another blog entry. I hope that you all enjoyed the reprieve offered to you by Jon, an integral member of Team Monster and our comic authority. Who know’s what he’ll pull from out of his sleeve in the future?

As October falls downward in a steady spiral, each day brings us closer and closer to the launch of the very first edition of The Enigmatic Monster. Who knows what will happen next?

Who knows what other monstrosities we will birth?

Another day, another dollar; and once again another blog entry. Insanity. That’s what I offer you; it is in all likelihood one tenth of the essence of the King in Yellow. So, in honour of Fall, and in the spirit of October: we shall fall downward in a steady spiral, until we can fall no longer.

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The King in Yellow, Part 2

Addendum:

I noticed something while going through The Repairer of Reputations for part two of The King in Yellow mini-series. I had named the main character incorrectly. The main character of that short story was named Hildred Castaigne. Hildred was, however, the son of Hastur.

It may be interesting to note though, that a certain author (and a few others), while reworking the entire Lovecraft universe, called the King in Yellow an avatar of Hastur, who in turn was one of the Great Old Ones. It will also be of interest that Lovecraft was in turn inspired by the work of R. W. Chambers, and included symbolism from the King in Yellow in some of his stories.

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The King in Yellow, Part 1

Now here is something which ties in nicely with the previous article on paranoia. Truth be told this fits in nicely with perspective and mental health, if one wishes to see it that way; I certainly do.

The King in Yellow:

Who and what is this King in Yellow—this stranger in the tattered robes? Is he death personified or is he the essence of insanity? What is he that he himself, and even his sign, should be feared?

After all—and truth be told—the King in Yellow is only from a book.

Enter into this world that Robert W. Chambers has created, a world where a cursed book holds the secrets of life, truths to terrible to behold. This is a book which has been banned. All who read it experience insanity. Some more to than others. Those who cross paths with the King in Yellow are touched in so many ways, ways good and bad. In this book are their stories.

The Repairer of Reputations:

I pray God will curse the writer, as the writer has cursed the world with this beautiful, stupendous creation, terrible in its simplicity, irresistible in its truth—a world which now trembles before the King in Yellow. When the French Government seized the translated copies which had just arrived in Paris, London, of course, became eager to read it. It is well known how the book spread like an infectious disease, from city to city, from continent to continent, barred out here, confiscated there, denounced by Press and pulpit, censured even by the most advanced literary anarchists. No definite principals had been violated in those wicked pages, no doctrine promulgated, no convictions outraged. It could not be judged by any known standard, yet, although it was acknowledged that the supreme note of art had been struck in The King in Yellow, all felt that human nature could not bear the strain, nor thrive on words in which the essence of purest poison lurked. The very banality and innocence of the first act only allowed the blow to fall afterward with more awful effect.

-The King in Yellow, by Robert W. Chambers

Hastur, sane or insane, knew what he saw then . . .

. . . Which leaves us to wonder if we’re not all living a fantasy, one which ill-fated Hastur has become disenchanted with. It begs the question: are we the fiddlers on the roof, or is he the feral cat out of the bag?

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