Love and Rage

Love and Rage

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I do know that for the sympathy of one living being, I would make peace with all. I have love in me the likes of which you can scarcely imagine and rage the likes of which you would not believe. If I cannot satisfy the one, I will indulge the other.

― Mary Shelley

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But Ideal Mankind . . .

But Ideal Mankind . . .

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Creation destroys as it goes, throws down one tree for the rise of another. But ideal mankind would abolish death, multiply itself million upon million, rear up city upon city, save every parasite alive, until the accumulation of mere existence is swollen to a horror.
–D. H. Lawrence

Friday Fright Night

Friday Fright Night

We found this little gem in our reader this week, courtesy of the Lovecraft eZine. You can find their original post here (if you don’t already follow them, we recommend that you do, especially if you’re into the bizarre).

Matters at Hand . . .

Matters at Hand . . .

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Even with the utterly lost, to whom life and death are equally jests, there are matters of which no jest can be made.

–Edgar Allan Poe

Only Then Do We Forgive . . .

Only Then Do We Forgive . . .

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When we forgive evil we do not excuse it, we do not tolerate it, we do not smother it. We look the evil full in the face, call it what it is, let its horror shock and stun and enrage us, and only then do we forgive it.

–Lewis B. Smedes

Imagine No Imagination?

Imagine No Imagination?

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Where there is no imagination there is no horror.

–Arthur Conan Doyle

It’s all in your head*, or so you’ve been told. But don’t think too hard on it, that’ll only make things worse . . .

*How many times did they say that in the movie Chicken Run?

Evil Among Us . . .

Evil Among Us . . .

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Evil hiding among us is an ancient theme . . .

–John Carpenter

 . . . They’re here! 

(And we’re not enjoying it at all!)

A Minor Hiccup

A Minor Hiccup

Normally we have a post every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. However we have been experiencing some minor hiccups brought on by our normal day jobs, broken computers, etcetera . . . According to the Jake human, we have two podcasts that are ready to go, they just need to be uploaded. We were hoping to get a podcast out by today at the latest. So far that has not been possible, so we would like to apologize to our fans, and supporters.

Rest assured, our normal shenanigans shall resume this coming Monday, for all to witness . . . The inane babble of so many worms will go on!

If your looking to challenge yourself, head over to this lovely post by our Wordmaster*: RJ Davies Mornix.

A Good Start, by RJ Davies Mornix.

-Penny C, as dictated by Theo Monster

*AKA editor

Words Have No Power . . .

Words Have No Power . . .

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Half of What You See . . .

Half of What You See . . .

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Believe only half of what you see and nothing that you hear

–Edgar Allan Poe

Here, here! What say you?

What the Heck Are We Doing?

What the Heck Are We Doing?

IMG_0240 IMG_0241 IMG_0242What are we doing? And why did we take grainy photos of it?

Work in progress shots from the upcoming poster project we’re contributing to. We’re creating minimalist posters with ink, and we’ll be putting them together in photoshop. Can you guess a movie? Say you will . . . The monster will love you for all eternity!

 

For the Love of Trees

For the Love of Trees

The Man Whom the Trees Loved is another short, supernatural horror story from Algernon Blackwood. You can download it for free from Project Gutenberg, or buy it on Amazon for cheap (in mega-pack form).

By the way, we love Algernon Blackwood. Blackwood good. Delicious, even . . .

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Buy Safe BBQs!

Buy Safe BBQs!

Enigmatic Podcast #14. In where the Jake and Jon humans natter away like so many worms  . . .

. . . Sorry for the delay; I forced them to have a death match with someone else . . . Fortunately no one was hurt.

–Theo Monster

Searchers After Horror . . .

Searchers After Horror . . .

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Searchers after horror haunt strange, far places.

–H. P. Lovecraft

Here’s to the quote of the week! Who wants to go on a vacation?

At the Mountains of Madness

At the Mountains of Madness

mountainsmadnessEnough said.

April Updates

April Updates

Here are a few things to look forward to in April:

-A nice touch to our brand image, to freshen things up a bit . . .

and

-The second issue of EMP at the end of this month!

We hope you’ve enjoyed the journey with us so far. If all goes well Team Monster will continue on with the project (another two issues). If you have any ideas that you would like to share with us, feel free to send them our way: monstrousenigma@gmail.com.

icon_2014Like what we’re doing? Spread us to the far corners of the world!
Don’t forget to show your support and love for the monster:
Love us on Facebook,
Follow the monster on Twitter,
And take a look-see at our Instagram (we really like sunsets, and snow . . .).

Carmilla: A Review

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Carmilla: A Review

Carmilla is an evil, crafty, blood-thirsty vampire.

She is also a lesbian.

Need I say more?

(You could also argue that she is bisexual, but that’s besides the point.)

In contrast to The Vampyre, Carmilla focuses more on character and plot development. And by that I mean more detail. Our main protagonist is also a woman, which is a refreshing change, even if she does end up as the damsel in distress (curse those evil vampires!).

What else is there to say, other than you can expect this vampire story to be just that: a vampire story. It’s a little bit longer than The Vampyre, but it is still a fairly quick read.

Should you read it? Of course!

It’s still a better love story than Twilight.

The Vampyre

The Vampyre

IT happened that in the midst of the dissipations attendant upon a London winter . . .

The Vampyre, by John William Polidori is a tale both short and simple, if not sweet. As the name suggests it is indeed about a vampire. It has everything that a story could ever want: a villain, a would-be hero, a love interest, and of course: victims. However, don’t be fooled by this. Nothing is as it seems, and the story does not spend too much time in explaining itself either. You’re given some of the vampire mythos, plunged into the story, and then given another side to the tale . . .

Essentially, where Dracula is a labour of love, filled with complex characters and plot, The Vampyre is a minuscule side trip. Both are good stories, but should not be compared to each other too much (if at all).

I’m not a fan of vampires or zombies, but this story was a pleasant surprise. It was even shorter than I expected. So, do I recommend it? Yes, give it a try. You might be surprised as well.

P.S: for those of you who like to make fun of the things you like in your head, rest assured that there are some jokes that the story practically sets itself up for. 

P.P.S: the story is available for free download on Project Gutenberg.

Like what we’re doing? Show us your support by spreading us to the far corners of the world!
Love the monster on Facebook!
Twitter @monstrousenigma
Instagram: enigmaticmonster

Mundane Things, Part Two

Four Weird TalesMundane Things, Part Two

When I went back to reading Four Weird Tales, I noticed something in the grouping of the stories. It seemed to me that the first two stories dealt more specifically with beliefs. We know that if you believe something, it will colour the way you see things (a nice rose tint, perhaps). For the sake of argument, I’ll say that The Insanity of Jones and The Man Who Found Out deal more specifically with beliefs and their effects upon perception; in a nutshell, a certain belief affects the way these characters think and act, and ultimately how they see their day to day lives.

(Well, that was slightly redundant . . . Only just slightly, a little tiny bit . . . Maybe.  )

If those two deal with belief and perception, what do the other two deal with then? Again, for the sake of argument, I’m going to say that they deal with what we see. That is to say, we see before we perceive. Everything else follows after that . . .

. . . I see therefore I think, and then I think some more . . .

(And maybe I discern some great truth? Or see something.)

The Glamour of the Snow was right up my alley; I loved it because it was a perfect mix of all of my favourite things. Now in that story our main character isn’t seeking out great truths or hunting down enemies from certain past lives—he’s leading a normal life, working by day and socializing by night (while still managing a reasonable bed time too, I bet). There’s nothing abnormal about him, so when our antagonist comes waltzing right in he doesn’t know any better. It looks like a normal person, and that person is a lady!

Naturally, things follow their course. We know well before he does that something is amiss. The minor side characters know what’s going on before he does, because he doesn’t truly know what he is actually seeing.

Because he hasn’t seen anything like it before.

(And if he doesn’t know what he’s seeing, what on earth is he going to think?)

This can be argued to death. But I think you get my drift. Just a little food for thought. Now let’s take a moment to salute those authors of horror and weird fiction—and thank them—for ruining perfectly mundane things!

We all know those authors of horror and weird fiction scare only out of concern for our well-being.
So let’s take a moment to keep it monstrous. Love the monster on Facebook.
(Facebook is pretty creepy sometimes too. Remember the time when the status box asked you what you were doing? Remember when it called you by name? WHOA!)

Hell House

The House on the Borderland

I am not superstitious; but I have ceased to deny that things happen in this old house—things that I cannot explain; and, therefore, I must needs ease my mind, by writing down an account of them, to the best of my ability; though, should this, my diary, ever be read when I am gone, the readers will but shake their heads, and be the more convinced that I was mad.

-Excerpt from The House on the Borderland, by William Hope Hodgson

The House on the Borderland

I do not want to do this; it is not a thing which I relish very much, and yet I do it nonetheless. Someone must . . .

. . . So I will take the plunge. I read a small line which described The House on the Borderland as being long-winded, or something like that. The story does goes on a tangent for about half of the book, and yet I find myself disagreeing with that statement.

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Lair of the White Worm

Lair of the White Worm

“Seeing where the head of the monster was, the two men ventured a little further forward, and saw that the hidden mass at the base of the shaft was composed of vast coils of the great serpent’s body, forming a base from which the upright mass rose. As they looked, this lower mass moved, the glistening folds catching the moonlight, and they could see that the monster’s progress was along the ground. It was coming towards them at a swift pace, so they turned and ran, taking care to make as little noise as possible, either by their footfalls or by disturbing the undergrowth close to them. They did not stop or pause till they saw before them the high dark tower of Doom.”

-Excerpt from Lair of the White Worm, by Bram Stoker

The Willows gradually lead in to Lair of the White Worm, a lush, sprawling narrative. It took me places I never expected . . .

Okay, I’ll spare you the purple prose.

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