Believe in Things

4_quote

Believe in Things

I want you to believe…to believe in things that you cannot.
–Bram Stoker, Dracula

Sometimes you’re better off not knowing. That’s my counter-argument for the day, besides the fact that Dracula is a good book, and so is The Historian.

coopid

More Machen

Please, by all means . . . If I were to swim in a sea of words, let his be among many. I don’t get how someone can inspire so many people to pick up a pen and spell out something terrifying, when the man himself never truly wrote about horrors outright. His is the quiet shout. Contemplative, tempting, but not always out right. Maybe that’s why I enjoy his work; to me it doesn’t seem like it’s always trying to be terrifying. Sometimes it doesn’t try hard enough*. Somehow I always find myself coming back for me–in fact I would read his work over Algernon Blackwood (who has provided me with much reading material).

Today I finished reading The White People. Title aside, the book is more along the lines of The Great God Pan . . . Somewhat. It was a surprisingly short read, and at the end turned into a cautionary tale. The writing was good, and once again the characters were very well written. I don’t have any major nit picks, except the length (it could have gone on forever, because it ended just when it was starting to get really interesting).

So, do I recommend this book? Yes, even if it’s only to pass the time. It also has some interesting ideas.

*Sometimes it varies from trying to hard to getting it right. Nobody’s perfect.

ashkenaz

Dead and Dreaming

quote_34

Dead and Dreaming

Ph’nglui mglw’nafh Cthulhu R’lyeh wgah’nagl fhtagn.

In his house at R’lyeh dead Cthulhu waits dreaming.
― H.P. Lovecraft, The Call of Cthulhu

I hope I’m not the only one who’s asked this question: how does one go about being dead and dreaming at the same time? Every time I’ve read this quote, or have read of Cthulhu being referred to as dead, I’ve questioned this. Every time.

And in all seriousness: how does one go about being dead and dreaming at the same time?

It must be a trick question.

P.S: I just thought of something hilarious: the equivalent of me trying to read that Old One gobbledegook would be someone farting. Oh, my poor sanity . . .

Theo_icon

A Banana For Your Thoughts

Because money is ridiculous.

A Banana For Your Thoughts

Because we repeat the title for search engine optimization. That’s probably not how those work, but this is a horror blog and the internet is filled with angry, cannibal trolls. So, today was supposed to be ‘Horror Quote Hump Day’ (yes, we’re still trying to make that a thing) and there was an awesome quote from The Wolves of God that I wanted to share, but unfortunately that never happened. So, apologies are due.

But, on the topic of Algernon Blackwood (who wrote The Wolves of God), I’ve still been keeping up with reading his works. So far I have to say that his strength lies in his short stories. So far the best ones I’ve read are still The Willows, and The Wendigo (which is my favourite of the two). Recently I started to read Chinese Magic (who knows how that will turn out). The worst book by him that I’ve read is (I literally forgot the name because it was not that great in my opinion, so bear with me) . . . . Da, na, na, na, banana, na, na, na . . . The Centaur.

Sorry, allow me to rephrase that.

THE CENTAUR!

(Why not?)

It was long-winded, and didn’t quite deliver on the psycholgical horror–which it is not. It’s not really horror. Maybe you could argue that parts of it are implied horror. Only from the perspectives of the secondary characters however. The story itself is more about the main character’s spiritual journey. At times the story would come on to a really good idea.

A good idea for an Algernon Blackwood horror story!

But then there would be a bout of description diahhrea so bad, that whatever spark of genius that was born would shrivel up in dissapointment, slinking away like a spanked monkey, then promptly dying in a moldy box out yonder. A much more poetic way to kill an idea, you will not find. Unless it’s a bad idea. Bad ideas don’t deserve anything.

But, long story short, I actually skipped pages. Lots of them. Just to get to the point.

Long story short: The Centaur is not one Algernon Blackwood’s best. (And if it is . . . Why I oughta!)

coopid

Nemesis

quote_t30

Nemesis

I have seen the dark universe yawning
Where the black planets roll without aim,
Where they roll in their horror unheeded,
Without knowledge, or lustre, or name.
― H.P. Lovecraft, Nemesis

coopid

That at Which

quote_29

We shall see that at which dogs howl in the dark, and that at which cats prick up their ears after midnight.
― H.P Lovecraft

That At Which

Often, you find yourself wondering. Don’t deny it. Everybody’s doing it, some more rationally than others, if rationality exist. If anything really exists. Maybe we are just a dream waiting to end? Do the people in our dreams have their own lives, independent from our own subconscious? If that is the case, then I suppose we could too, if we were all a dream.

Let’s not wait till midnight to find out.

Theo_icon

How to Spend Your Free Time Wisely

How to Spend Your Free Time Wisely

We bring you another recommendation from the Lovecraft eZine! They’ve got some quality stuff there, but don’t just take our word for it. Observe these Lovecraftian movie recommendations, and then be entranced by these free Lovecraftian studio movies! Sit down and relax with a pumpkin-whatever while you’re at it (or your tea, or your coffee, or whatever else you mortals drink today)!

In another dimension, some of the team will be performing a reading tonight! More info to come on that . . .

Regards,
Theo Monster

Theo_icon

Love and Rage

Love and Rage

quote_18

I do know that for the sympathy of one living being, I would make peace with all. I have love in me the likes of which you can scarcely imagine and rage the likes of which you would not believe. If I cannot satisfy the one, I will indulge the other.

― Mary Shelley

Theo_icon

But Ideal Mankind . . .

But Ideal Mankind . . .

quote_15

Creation destroys as it goes, throws down one tree for the rise of another. But ideal mankind would abolish death, multiply itself million upon million, rear up city upon city, save every parasite alive, until the accumulation of mere existence is swollen to a horror.
–D. H. Lawrence

Friday Fright Night

Friday Fright Night

We found this little gem in our reader this week, courtesy of the Lovecraft eZine. You can find their original post here (if you don’t already follow them, we recommend that you do, especially if you’re into the bizarre).

Matters at Hand . . .

Matters at Hand . . .

quote_13

Even with the utterly lost, to whom life and death are equally jests, there are matters of which no jest can be made.

–Edgar Allan Poe

Only Then Do We Forgive . . .

Only Then Do We Forgive . . .

quote_11

When we forgive evil we do not excuse it, we do not tolerate it, we do not smother it. We look the evil full in the face, call it what it is, let its horror shock and stun and enrage us, and only then do we forgive it.

–Lewis B. Smedes

Imagine No Imagination?

Imagine No Imagination?

quote_10

Where there is no imagination there is no horror.

–Arthur Conan Doyle

It’s all in your head*, or so you’ve been told. But don’t think too hard on it, that’ll only make things worse . . .

*How many times did they say that in the movie Chicken Run?

. . . And the Strongest Kind of Fear

 . . . And the Strongest Kind of Fear

quote_9

The oldest and strongest emotion of mankind is fear, and the oldest and strongest kind of fear is fear of the unknown.

–HP Lovecraft

Half of What You See . . .

Half of What You See . . .

quote_6

Believe only half of what you see and nothing that you hear

–Edgar Allan Poe

Here, here! What say you?

To the Sober Eye of Reason . . .

To the Sober Eye of Reason . . .

quote_4

There are moments when even to the sober eye of reason, the world of our sad humanity may assume the semblance of Hell.

–Edgar Allan Poe

Irony is Seldom Absent . . .

Irony is Seldom Absent . . .

quote_5

From even the greatest of horrors irony is seldom absent.

–H.P. Lovecraft

And the horror quote of this week is brought to us by the purveyor of eldritch abominations.

Cheers!

For the Love of Trees

For the Love of Trees

The Man Whom the Trees Loved is another short, supernatural horror story from Algernon Blackwood. You can download it for free from Project Gutenberg, or buy it on Amazon for cheap (in mega-pack form).

By the way, we love Algernon Blackwood. Blackwood good. Delicious, even . . .

IMG_0138

Continue reading

Existence Without Consent . . .

Existence Without Consent . . .

quote_3

Whatever in creation exists without my knowledge exists without my consent.

–Cormac McCarthy

We tend to say that a lot, but we’re only human. I wonder how many species have gone extinct because of that train of thought?

On the other hand, Cthulu! 

And that’s about all there is to say on the matter.

Searchers After Horror . . .

Searchers After Horror . . .

quote_2

Searchers after horror haunt strange, far places.

–H. P. Lovecraft

Here’s to the quote of the week! Who wants to go on a vacation?

At the Mountains of Madness

At the Mountains of Madness

mountainsmadnessEnough said.

Carmilla: A Review

IMG_1460

Carmilla: A Review

Carmilla is an evil, crafty, blood-thirsty vampire.

She is also a lesbian.

Need I say more?

(You could also argue that she is bisexual, but that’s besides the point.)

In contrast to The Vampyre, Carmilla focuses more on character and plot development. And by that I mean more detail. Our main protagonist is also a woman, which is a refreshing change, even if she does end up as the damsel in distress (curse those evil vampires!).

What else is there to say, other than you can expect this vampire story to be just that: a vampire story. It’s a little bit longer than The Vampyre, but it is still a fairly quick read.

Should you read it? Of course!

It’s still a better love story than Twilight.

The Vampyre

The Vampyre

IT happened that in the midst of the dissipations attendant upon a London winter . . .

The Vampyre, by John William Polidori is a tale both short and simple, if not sweet. As the name suggests it is indeed about a vampire. It has everything that a story could ever want: a villain, a would-be hero, a love interest, and of course: victims. However, don’t be fooled by this. Nothing is as it seems, and the story does not spend too much time in explaining itself either. You’re given some of the vampire mythos, plunged into the story, and then given another side to the tale . . .

Essentially, where Dracula is a labour of love, filled with complex characters and plot, The Vampyre is a minuscule side trip. Both are good stories, but should not be compared to each other too much (if at all).

I’m not a fan of vampires or zombies, but this story was a pleasant surprise. It was even shorter than I expected. So, do I recommend it? Yes, give it a try. You might be surprised as well.

P.S: for those of you who like to make fun of the things you like in your head, rest assured that there are some jokes that the story practically sets itself up for. 

P.P.S: the story is available for free download on Project Gutenberg.

Like what we’re doing? Show us your support by spreading us to the far corners of the world!
Love the monster on Facebook!
Twitter @monstrousenigma
Instagram: enigmaticmonster